2013 © Tony Corocher | All Rights Reserved | Do not use anywhere without written authorization

Photo-essay – My trip to Koyasan, the Shingon Buddhism Center

Mount Kōya (高野山 Kōya-san?) is the name of mountains in Wakayama Prefecture to the south of Osaka. Also, Kōya-san is a modifying word for Kongōbu-ji (金剛峯寺). There is no one mountain officially called Kōya-san (高野山) in Japan.

First settled in 819 by the monk Kūkai, Mt. Kōya is primarily known as the world headquarters of the Kōyasan Shingon sect of Japanese Buddhism. Located in an 800 m high valley amid the eight peaks of the mountain (which was the reason this location was selected, in that the terrain is supposed to resemble a lotus plant), the original monastery has grown into the town of Kōya, featuring a university dedicated to religious studies and 120 temples, many of which offer lodging to pilgrims. The mountain is home to the following famous site (source wikipedia): continue here

2013 © Tony Corocher | All Rights Reserved | Do not use anywhere without written authorization

Danjogaran Koyasan by night – KONGOBUJI(金剛峰寺)
2013 © Tony Corocher | All Rights Reserved | Do not use anywhere without written authorization

 

2013 © Tony Corocher | All Rights Reserved | Do not use anywhere without written authorization

Entrance to Danjogaran Koyasan by night – KONGOBUJI(金剛峰寺)
2013 © Tony Corocher | All Rights Reserved | Do not use anywhere without written authorization

 

Danjogaran Koyasan  - KONGOBUJI(金剛峰寺) 2013 © Tony Corocher | All Rights Reserved | Do not use anywhere without written authorization

Danjogaran Koyasan – KONGOBUJI(金剛峰寺)
2013 © Tony Corocher | All Rights Reserved | Do not use anywhere without written authorization

 


A ryokan (旅館?) is a type of traditional Japanese inn that originated in the Edo period (1603–1868), when such inns served travelers along Japan’s highways. They typically feature tatami-matted rooms, communal baths, and other public areas where visitors may wear yukata and talk with the owner (source: wikipedia)

 

Koyasan - Japan - inside the Ryokan (Japanese inn) run by the monks

Koyasan – Japan – inside the Ryokan (Japanese inn) where I spent the night
2013 © Tony Corocher | All Rights Reserved | Do not use anywhere without written authorization

 

Koyasan - Japan - inside the Ryokan (Japanese inn) run by the monks

Koyasan – Japan – inside the Ryokan (Japanese inn) run by the monks
2013 © Tony Corocher | All Rights Reserved | Do not use anywhere without written authorization

 

2013 © Tony Corocher | All Rights Reserved | Do not use anywhere without written authorization

Internal garden in the Fokuchi-In Ryokan where I spent the night
2013 © Tony Corocher | All Rights Reserved | Do not use anywhere without written authorization

 

2013 © Tony Corocher | All Rights Reserved | Do not use anywhere without written authorization

Internal garden in the Fokuchi-In Ryokan where I spent the night
2013 © Tony Corocher | All Rights Reserved | Do not use anywhere without written authorization

 

2013 © Tony Corocher | All Rights Reserved | Do not use anywhere without written authorization

Internal garden in the Ryokan where I was staying
2013 © Tony Corocher | All Rights Reserved | Do not use anywhere without written authorization

 

2013 © Tony Corocher | All Rights Reserved

Internal garden in the Ryokan where I was staying
2013 © Tony Corocher | All Rights Reserved | Do not use anywhere without written authorization

 


While I was strolling around Koyasan, I run into a private “walking over hot coal” purifying local Ceremony held at the Tokugawa Family Mausoleum. It wasn’t that easy to get these shots, but here they are… hope you like them

2013 © Tony Corocher | All Rights Reserved | Do not use anywhere without written authorization

Monk playing the drums during a walking over hot coals private ceremony held at the Tokugawa Family Mausoleum
2013 © Tony Corocher | All Rights Reserved | Do not use anywhere without written authorization

 

Koyasan - Walking over hot coals - Private Local Ceremony at the Tokugawa Family Mausoleum

Koyasan – Walking over hot coals – Private Local Ceremony at the Tokugawa Family Mausoleum

 

Koyasan - Walking over hot coals - Private Local Ceremony at the Tokugawa Family Mausoleum

Koyasan – Walking over hot coals – Private Local Ceremony at the Tokugawa Family Mausoleum

 

Koyasan - Walking over hot coals - Private Local Ceremony at the Tokugawa Family Mausoleum

Koyasan – Walking over hot coals – Private Local Ceremony at the Tokugawa Family Mausoleum

 

Koyasan - Walking over hot coals - Private Local Ceremony at the Tokugawa Family Mausoleum

Koyasan – Walking over hot coals – Private Local Ceremony at the Tokugawa Family Mausoleum

 

Koyasan - Walking over hot coals - Private Local Ceremony at the Tokugawa Family Mausoleum

Koyasan – Walking over hot coals – Private Local Ceremony at the Tokugawa Family Mausoleum

ACCESS TO KOYASAN:
The mountain is accessible primarily by the Nankai Electric Railway from Namba Station (in Osaka) to Gokurakubashi Station at the base of the mountain. A cable car from Gokurakubashi then whisks visitors to the top in 5 minutes. The entire trip takes about 1.5 hours on an express train or 2 hours by non-express. Local automobile traffic can be very heavy on weekends until well into the evening. On weekdays however, the mountain offers a pleasant drive followed by the excitement upon reaching the monasteries lining the summit. Many Buddhist monasteries on the mountain function as hotels for visitors providing traditional accommodation with an evening meal and breakfast. (source: wikipedia)

 

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